Get Started in Germany

Reasons for Germany

  • 1

    Open Market

    Germany is an open market and warmly welcomes foreign investors. That is demonstrated by the 22,000 foreign enterprises that have established businesses in Germany and now employ more than 2.7 million people. The German market is open to entrepreneurial investment in practically all areas.

  • 2

    International Location

    More than 7 million foreigners live in Germany. Several metropolitan regions have prominent foreign communities with their own schools, churches, shops and restaurants. 70%+ of German blue- and white-collar workers can speak English

  • 3

    Qualified Personnel

    Germany offers an exceptionally well-qualified, motivated and conscientious workforce. German employees’ high standard of knowledge and skills is internationally recognized. The demand for professionals is met by 383 institutions of higher education.

  • 4

    High Level of Innovation

    Statistically, Germany has 277 international patents per one million inhabitants – more than anywhere else in the world. The close cooperation between industry and world-famous research institutions like the Max Planck and Fraunhofer Institutes swiftly transforms new ideas into products for the world market.

  • 5

    Highly Developed Infrastructure

    Germany has a closely knit network of roads, railways and international airports. That guarantees swift connections. The airport in Frankfurt is an international hub. The Port of Hamburg is one of largest container transshipment centers in Europe.

  • 6

    Legal Security

    Germany is a modern constitutional state with transparent and reasonable laws. The advantages are internationally recognized. The German legal system has served as a model for legal systems in many other countries. International studies demonstrate that German legal security is highly regarded by investors. Among all countries, Germany ranks fourth in terms of legal security.

Germany is #1 in Best Countries Ranking according to 2016 US-News

The World Bank LPI is an interactive benchmarking tool created to help countries identify the challenges and opportunities they face in their performance on trade logistics and what they can do to improve their performance. The LPI 2016 allows for comparisons across 160 countries - http://lpi.worldbank.org/international/global

Germany ranks 1.st in the global Logistics Performance Index 2016

US News

Germany, the most populous nation in the European Union, possesses one of the largest economies in the world and has seen its role in the international community grow steadily since reunification. The Central European country borders nine nations, and its landscape varies, from the northern plains that reach to the North and Baltic seas to the Bavarian Alps in the south.

Germany employs a social market economy – open-market capitalism that also carries certain social service guarantees. Its economy is one of the world’s largest and Germany is one of the globe’s leading importers and exporters. Services, which include industries such as telecommunications, health care and tourism, contribute the greatest amount to the country’s economy. Industry and agriculture are other significant economic sectors.

Germany possesses a highly skilled, affluent workforce. The country’s population is aging, however, raising questions about the high level of spending for social services. The overwhelming majority of citizens are ethnic German, with Turks and other Europeans representing significant minority populations. The country is one of the world’s most popular migration destinations, and the size of the foreign-born population in Germany has grown substantially in the 21st century.

Culturally, Germany has produced some of the world’s leading figures in the natural and social sciences, as well as the arts. The land that gave birth to the modern printing press, Ludwig van Beethoven and Immanuel Kant has strong traditions in literature, music and philosophy. Folk festivals remain popular in modern-day Germany, the most notable being the annual Oktoberfest.

Germany belongs to major international organizations, including the United Nations, the European Union, Group of 20, NATO and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

German Economy

For decades, Germany has been a country with a highly developed, high-cost, economy. The opportunities - but also the risks - of a German investment are therefore numerous, real and calculable. On the positive side, Germany offers the foreign investor exciting national and international marketing and business perspectives. These are inextricably linked to the long-standing commitment to European integration and the traditionally strong business and cultural ties to most other European countries. The cultured, highly trained and educated working population provides the medium for turning these perspectives to practical advantage.

The downside to this is that costs - and especially employment costs - when measured in terms of wage rates, social security and other charges levied on employers - are comparatively high. Investment success in Germany is thus dependent on a carefully planned, sophisticated operation. In this sense, Germany is very much an "up-market" country.

The German investment climate, both inward and outward, is both open and complex. The worldwide economic turbulences have now made it volatile as well. The government has embarked on a massive stabilization programme to fend off the worst of the recession and there are encouraging signs of a return to lasting growth. Nevertheless, investment today still rewards those with a carefully considered investment structure.

German versus United Kingdom

De GDP Growth Rate Uk GDP Growth Rate

GDP Growth Rate in the United Kingdom went up to 0.7 Percent in Q4 2016 from 0.6 Percent in Q3 2016. Germany GDP Growth Rate rose to 0.4 Percent in Q4 2016 from 0.3 Percent in Q4 2015

De Unemployment Rate Uk Unemployment Rate

GDP Growth Rate in the United Kingdom went up to 0.7 Percent in Q4 2016 from 0.6 Percent in Q3 2016. Germany GDP Growth Rate rose to 0.4 Percent in Q4 2016 from 0.3 Percent in Q4 2015

Places To Live
Cost of Living

German Geography

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project.

In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births. However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 - depending on immigration levels.

Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditionally industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centres of Cologne/Düsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so, and to take all their assets with them.

There is still a certain amount of migration within Germany itself, generally from east to west, although this trend is now slowing as living standards and costs in the east rise towards the national average. The German population does not have a tradition of mobility within the country. Movement is hampered by cultural differences and by other factors, such as the decentralised education system with a different syllabus for the schools of each province. There are only two indigenous national minorities, a small Danish minority in northern Schleswig-Holstein and a small Sorb population living in the general area to the south east of Berlin.

However, the foreign population numbers some 7.2m (nearly 9% of the total), of which Turkish citizens form by far the largest single national group, numbering 1.7m. Other significant groups are Italians, Poles, Serbs, Greeks and Croats.

From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, the then West German state actively encouraged the recruitment of foreign labour, particularly in other European countries with high unemployment, to live and work in Germany for a temporary period. This policy was reversed in 1973 to one of restriction, with the general aim of reducing or at least containing the number of non-EU citizens working in Germany. The restriction gave foreign workers already resident a considerable inducement to remain if they possibly could, so the foreign population tended to become permanently, rather then temporarily, resident. Indeed, by now, at least half the foreigners living in Germany have been here for more than ten years and many of the younger individuals are second or third generation residents who have never lived anywhere else.

German Population and Social Patterns

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project.

In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births. However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 - depending on immigration levels.

Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditionally industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centres of Cologne/Düsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so, and to take all their assets with them.

There is still a certain amount of migration within Germany itself, generally from east to west, although this trend is now slowing as living standards and costs in the east rise towards the national average. The German population does not have a tradition of mobility within the country. Movement is hampered by cultural differences and by other factors, such as the decentralised education system with a different syllabus for the schools of each province. There are only two indigenous national minorities, a small Danish minority in northern Schleswig-Holstein and a small Sorb population living in the general area to the south east of Berlin.

However, the foreign population numbers some 7.2m (nearly 9% of the total), of which Turkish citizens form by far the largest single national group, numbering 1.7m. Other significant groups are Italians, Poles, Serbs, Greeks and Croats.

From the early 1950s to the early 1970s, the then West German state actively encouraged the recruitment of foreign labour, particularly in other European countries with high unemployment, to live and work in Germany for a temporary period. This policy was reversed in 1973 to one of restriction, with the general aim of reducing or at least containing the number of non-EU citizens working in Germany. The restriction gave foreign workers already resident a considerable inducement to remain if they possibly could, so the foreign population tended to become permanently, rather then temporarily, resident. Indeed, by now, at least half the foreigners living in Germany have been here for more than ten years and many of the younger individuals are second or third generation residents who have never lived anywhere else.

German Political System

The constitutional form is the Federal Republic of Germany {Bundesrepublik Deutschland). Sixteen provinces {Länder) form the federation implied by the name. Each level of government (federation, province, district and local community) is directed by an elected body competent to take decisions on all matters remitted to it by the constitution. Berlin is the capital. It is the home of both chambers of the federal parliament and of most government ministries. Other ministries and government authorities are located in various German towns, particularly in Bonn, the former West German capital.

The federal parliament has two chambers. The lower chamber {Bundestag) is elected by the population for a four-year term. Its seats are allocated on a system of proportional representation. The government is formed by the party or coalition (in practice, invariably a coalition) with a majority of the seats. The remaining parties represented in the Bundestag form, collectively, the opposition. The upper chamber {Bundesrat) is made up of members delegated by the parliaments of the individual provinces with votes in rough proportion to the size of their populations. The party allegiances of its members reflect the identity of the governing party or coalition in each province. Most acts of parliament are initially proposed and debated in the Bundestag.

The Bundesrat does have certain rights to propose, or to propose changes to, bills, although its primary function is to safeguard the interests of the provinces against acts of expropriation by the federation. Since all acts affecting the interests of the provinces are subject to its approval, very few acts of national importance can be passed by the Bundestag without the support of the majority of the Bundesrat. This division of political functions and responsibilities forces a willingness to compromise on all major political parties.

German Legal System

The ultimate source of all law is the constitution or "Basic Statute" (Grundgesetz). Acts of either the federal or a provincial parliament are void if they conflict with the constitution or are passed in an unconstitutional manner. Similarly, all acts of the provincial parliaments must be in accordance with the provisions of the constitution of the relevant province. The government, individual ministries and other authorities have the power to issue guidelines, decrees and other pronouncements. These ordinances are of varying degrees of authority and require the approval of differing levels of government. Tax guidelines, for example, but not decrees, require the consent of the Bundesrat These extra-statutory instruments bind, at least to the extent of their own terms, the issuing authority and its subordinate authorities, but not courts of law. They cannot amend the law as it stands, but give guidance on the issuing authority's preferred interpretation thereof.

The German court system is decentralised. Initially, cases are held locally and appeals are made to a higher court responsible for a wider geographic area. The courts are divided into a number of different streams, each specializing in its own field of law. There are therefore separate courts to try tax, commercial and labour law suits. At the head of each stream is a single, federal supreme court to which appeals can be made by either side on points of law, but not of fact. The ultimate arbiter is the Constitutional Court in Karlsruhe to which final appeal can be made, although only on the grounds of conflict with the constitution.

The judgments of the Federal Constitutional Court are binding on all other courts. The judgments of all other courts including the supreme court of each stream are only binding in respect of the case tried and do not set binding precedents for other cases of a like nature. They may, however, give guidance to other courts, especially to lower courts of the same stream, although even a lower court is free to depart from an established precedent if it feels that circumstances warrant a change.